Posts Tagged ‘heart disease’


How the Built Environment Can Impact your Health

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Improving your health can be as simple as choosing to walk to work or to take the stairs instead of the escalator.  However, stairs are not even a viable option in some buildings and for some people it is not feasible to walk or bike to work.  This blog post examines how public health is […]

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Posted in Global Health, Health reform, National Healthcare, Non-communicable diseases; Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , .


The 2014 World Cup: Scoring a goal for public health?

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Beginning today, Brazil will play host to the world’s most-watched sporting event, the football World Cup. 3.7 million Brazilian and foreign tourists are expected to travel throughout Brazil during the World Cup, and nearly half the world’s population is anticipated to tune in for the tournament. Some effects are intuitive: worker productivity plummets, while hungry (and […]

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Posted in Global Health; Tagged: , , , , , , .


Retail Clinic: Friend or Foe?

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After not being able to get his son to the doctor for a strep throat test, Rick Krieger established the first retail clinic at a local grocery chain in 2000. The idea was to address issues of access to health care and allow patients to obtain care and treatment for minor conditions “in a quick, […]

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Posted in National Healthcare; Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .


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The views reflected in this blog are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent those of the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law or Georgetown University. This blog is solely informational in nature, and not intended as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed and retained attorney in your state or country.

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