Posts Tagged ‘disease surveillance’

The Strange Case of Nodding Syndrome in East Africa

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    Nodding Syndrome is described as a rare form of Epilepsy that disables children in Eastern Africa.  Chances are you have never heard of Nodding Syndrome before.  I hadn’t until recently.  This is likely because it is a rare disease that impacts children in East Africa, places the current President of the United States […]

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Posted in Global Health, WHO; Tagged: , , , , , .

Sexually Transmitted Ebola: Another Reason to Stigmatize Survivors?

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As Ebola retreats in West Africa, medical investigators are focused on two women who died of the disease recently. Ruth Tugbah, a 44-year-old food seller with no known risk factors, developed Ebola in Monrovia, Liberia and died in late March. She was the first person to test positive for Ebola more than two weeks after […]

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Posted in Global Health; Tagged: , , , , , , .

Using Maps to Track and Control Infectious Disease: Five Online Resources

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The recent Ebola outbreak has brought the the tracking and containment of infectious disease to the forefront of global consciousness. Indeed, tracking and monitoring the spread of disease is one of public health’s most important (and oldest) tasks. Ever since John Snow removed the handle from the Broad Street pump his hand-drawn maps indicated were at the center of […]

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Posted in Global Health; Tagged: , , , .


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